Documenting the Development of Your Ideas: How to Write as a Researcher

Documenting the Development of Your Ideas: How to Write as a Researcher

A workshop presented by
Suzanne Lane, '85, Acting Director of Writing Across the Curriculum
Janis Melvold, Lecturer in the Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies



Whenever we do research—whether in the library, the lab, or the field, or just reading the assigned texts for a class—we hope to develop new ideas: to form and test hypotheses, develop new and better methods, produce richer evidence, and refine existing theories. Our research is often collaborative, and always builds off of work by previous researchers and writers. But how do we develop new ideas from these sources? how do we document where others' ideas contribute to our thinking, and where our ideas build on theories and evidence that's already published? And why do the practices of incorporating and citing sources vary so much from one course to another? This workshop will help you learn how to write with sources—published, online, or live—in ways that will help both you and your readers understand how your ideas build on, and move beyond those of your sources.

Offered:

Date

Time

Location

Thursday, March 7

7PM-9PM

56-180

Tuesday, March 19

7PM-9PM

56-180

Tuesday, April 9

7PM-9PM

56-180

Wednesday, April 17

7PM-9PM

56-114



Email write@mit.edu with questions or to sign up for a workshop.

Students who have taken this workshop say:

"I benefited from exercises we did as a class. They were great—would want to do more"

"I liked the individual feedback"

Learning about "different systems of citation and note-taking were the most useful parts"

"It's an excellent writing workshop"


Faculty say:

"Dr. Lane was kind enough to present writing with sources in my communications course for Interphase Edge at MIT last summer...[and] I was impressed that Dr. Lane managed to make the subject engaging for students just out of high school, which I think says volumes about her insights, knowledge, and personable style."—Terence Heagney, Senior Lecturer, Sloan